GERMANY, TOGETHER WITH OTHER COUNTRIES, WILL BUILD A CORRIDOR IN THE BALTIC

GERMANY, TOGETHER WITH OTHER COUNTRIES, WILL BUILD A CORRIDOR IN THE BALTIC

The effects of the war between Russia and Ukraine are changing the way the market for the most valuable resources is managed, especially in Europe. After all, with Russia as the main exporter of products such as gas, its influence over other nations has kept it in a privileged position for decades.

However, this could change soon. Far from being manipulated by Russia and its energy monopoly, several European countries are aiming to create alternatives that help Europe regain stability. One of the nations most focused on this is Germany.

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From the outset, the foundations are barely laid, but the project could bring impressive results; a corridor that crosses the Baltic and Nordic seas to connect Latvia, Estonia, Finland, Lithuania, Poland and Germany with a new source of energy: hydrogen.

EU REPOWER PLAN 2023

After the start of the war between Ukraine and Russia, Europe had to start taking measures to avoid one crisis after another. As these two nations are suppliers of raw materials and essential products, the proposals did not take long to make themselves heard in the European Parliament.

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With a view to addressing the energy crisis and framed within the RePowerUE 2030 Plan, the ambitious project hopes to be able to generate up to 10 million tons of hydrogen as a stable source of energy, ultimately replacing gas from Russia.

The signatory companies within the project are:

  • OTHERS, from Germany.
  • GAZ-SYSTEM, from Poland.
  • Amber Grid, from Lithuania.
  • Conexus Baltic Grid, from Latvia.
  • Elering, from Estonia.
  • Gasgrid Finland, from Finland.

 

THE ECOLOGICAL BENEFIT

The infrastructure is expected to begin in Finland in 2023, and extend through the Baltic Sea nations and Poland, before ending in Germany. Thanks to this project, the European Union could not only begin to consolidate a safe and stable source of energy youporno. But, in addition, it will be able to progressively get rid of the use of fossil resources and direct European energy on a more ecological path.

Let us remember, after all, that replacing the gas with hydrogen would have a major impact on the environment: we are talking about a considerable and very significant reduction in greenhouse gases. It is proposed that this energy could be used in all areas, from transport to domestic heating.

 

THERE IS STILL WORK TO BE DONE

One of the biggest challenges for this corridor, in addition to providing enough to supply 6 nations, will be finding a space in the market that is strong enough to displace Russian gas.

Furthermore, the project is still in preliminary development and does not have a clearly defined roadmap. It is estimated that in the next year 2023 the partners that will be part of the project will begin to carry out feasibility studies.

However, there is no doubt that, if it comes to fruition, it could mean a new opportunity for other corridors that connect longer stretches, such as North Africa and Southern Europe.

 

 

Five main goals of Dutch foreign policy

Strengthening international governance
The objective of international governance is to create a peaceful, safe, prosperous and just world with a sustainable environment. The key to successful international governance is ensuring an effective international legal order, largely by strengthening the international organisations whose role is to maintain it. This is also the reason why the Netherlands is the host country to the International Criminal Court.

Like international environmental policy, financial and economic policy is an important aspect of international governance. Without balanced financial and economic governance, there can be no international justice or solidarity. The need for financial and economic governance flows from the growing interdependence of national economies, both regionally and globally.

The Netherlands regards human rights as fundamental to the international legal order, so human rights policy is an abiding concern of foreign and development policy.

Promoting international peace, security and stability
Dutch security policy has two main goals: the security of Dutch and allied territory and the promotion of international peace, security and stability.

Many countries are embroiled in violent conflict. A country in conflict cannot make serious headway in reducing poverty. On the other hand, poverty is often a breeding ground for conflict. So conflict management is vital to Dutch security policy. Recovery in conflict-ridden countries and regions requires peacebuilding as well as emergency aid and infrastructural and economic reconstruction.

The Netherlands will provide assistance wherever populations are under threat, whether from natural disasters or human actions. The only proviso is that the countries affected officially request assistance from the international community. Assistance of this kind is called humanitarian assistance.

Promoting European cooperation
After the Second World War, the countries of Europe resolved never to fight each other again. They sought to ensure peace via economic interdependence. In 1951, the European Coal and Steel Community was established, followed in 1957 by the European Economic Community (EEC). These were the first two institutional manifestations of European cooperation The European Union (EU) came into being with the signing of the Maastricht Treaty in 1992. On 1 May 2004, the European Union welcomed ten new member states, bringing the total membership to 25.

Reducing poverty sustainably
In 2000, the international community pledged to halve worldwide poverty by 2015. With this in mind, it set itself eight ambitious Millennium Development Goals. The Dutch minister responsible for development cooperation, Agnes van Ardenne, is striving to ensure that the Netherlands works towards these goals as efficiently and productively as possible. To this end, she is supporting public-private partnerships with civil society organisations, enterprises and educational institutions in rich and poor countries.

Maintaining and strengthening bilateral relations
To promote their national political and economic interests, countries have to maintain and strengthen bilateral, state-to-state relations. To do so, they need a network of missions.

The Netherlands is also using bilateral contacts to strengthen its international ties in the realm of education and to promote a sustainable global environment. Dutch international cultural policy aims to strengthen the Netherlands’ international cultural profile and to deepen its cultural ties with certain countries and regions.